Life in the Garden

AS A GARDEN AGES – LIFE INCREASES

The labyrinth in summer
The labyrinth in summer

WHAT BEGAN AS A FEW PLANTS HAS TRANSFORMED INTO AN OASIS

Newest pollinator native plant garden
Newest pollinator native plant garden
Terraced garden behind home
Twelve years ago this did not exist. It was a grass slope up to the steps. What will the pollinator garden look like in twelve years?

A REFUGE FOR ALL CREATURES GREAT AND SMALL

Twin fawns
Twin fawns

 

Native bee on white cone flower
Native bee on our native Echinacea

TAKE A MOMENT, LOOK CLOSELY AT A FLOWER, LOOK TO THE TREES …

Sweat bee on native Turk's Cap lily
Sweat bee on native Turk’s Cap lily
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

 

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Feed the Birds

Allowing native trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants to  proliferate not only strengthens the web of life it is partnering with Gaia.

Blue Jay bird on sumac

Adding additional food sources to the gardens helps to feed the creatures who share our space.

Chipmunk on sunflower

In eastern Pennsylvania October is the time to help gardens ready for the coming winter.

The potting shed in autumn

It is also a time to help the wildlife around us get ready for darker, colder days.

Downy Woodpecker on sunflower (bird)

Due to their high metabolic rate birds in particular need high-energy foods, those high in calorie and fat content.

Eastern Towhee (bird)

Juniper berries provide this important source of energy, containing 46% carbohydrate and 16% fat.

American robin bird on Eastern Red Cedar

Sunflower seeds contain almost 30 percent fat as well as fiber, protein, calcium, B vitamins, iron potassium and vitamin E.

Tuffed Titmouse on sunflower (bird)

Sharing a space means becoming a caretaker. We are an important part of the web of life. At this moment in time we are the only ones who can completely destroy it or strengthen each strand.

Black-capped Chickadee on sunflower (bird)

 

 

The Importance of Native Sumac

Numerous articles have been penned extolling the virtues of native plants.  The West Virgina Native Plant Society  has posted this article

Native Shrubs in wildlife landscaping

Exotics or invasive species squeeze out natives and diminish populations of both flora and fauna.

Terrestrial orchid flower Epipactis Helleborine  2
A Beautiful Invasive weed – Helleborine epipactis

In order to preserve our native ecosystems we need to recognize the importance of our natives.

Reflection of the sumac stand

This stand of sumac was a mass of shrubs when we became the caretakers of this farmstead.

3 flicker birds on sumac
Northern Flicker

 

We carefully thinned out the stand and today we have sumac trees which feed our native bird population.

Titmouse bird on sumac
Tuffed Titmouse

 

If you have Staghorn sumac growing on your property consider allowing them to reach their full potential.

Blue Jay  bird on sumac
Blue Jay

 

 

American robin bird on sumac in winter
American Robin

 

Both you and native wildlife will be rewarded!

Ruby-throated Hummingbird on sumac
Ruby-throated Hummingbird

 

Downy Woodpecker on sumac
Downy Woodpecker

 

Ficker bird on sumac
Northern Flicker