Long Time Gone

The last time I shared the life of the gardens nighttime temperatures were below freezing and there was snow on the ground.

Now windows are opened both day and night while the cacophony of bird songs overwhelm one’s sense of hearing.

Babies are born, flowers grow and vegetables harvested.

The gardens are another year older as are its inhabitants …

Parrot Tulip 2017
Parrot Tulip
Bearded Iris
Bearded Iris
Mourning Dove
Mourning Dove
Robin family
Robin family
Baltimore butterfly
Baltimore butterfly
Juvenile Grey Squirrel
Juvenile Grey Squirrel
Eastern Cottontail rasbbit
Eastern Cottontail rabbit

 

 

Late – April Garden Walk

Reseeded Hellebore flower
Reseeded Hellebore flower
Daffodil and Hyacinth flowers in front garden
Daffodil and Hyacinth flowers in front garden

 Not only day-to-day

Reseeded Hellebore flowers
Reseeded Hellebore flowers

But moment to moment a garden changes

Dutchman's Breeches after the rain
Dutchman’s Breeches after the rain

A shadow cast, sun rays illuminating

Sumac stand reflected in pond near labyrinth in lower gardens
Sumac stand reflected in pond near labyrinth in lower gardens

Creatures warming on heated rocks

Common Garter Snake
Common Garter Snake

Birds stealth-like movements

Flicker photo taken with Nikon Coolpix P150
Flicker Photo taken with Nikon Coolpix P150

Flowers in bloom

Red Riding Hood rock garden tulip
Red Riding Hood rock garden tulip

Green prevails

Hellebore flower
Hellebore flower

Life is organic – life is change

Siberian Squill - Scilla and Euonymus
Siberian Squill – Scilla and Euonymus

Enjoy every moment

Wood stump sculpture In front flower bed
Wood stump sculpture In front flower bed

A Storm Is Coming

Friday night, April 19, 2013, 75 degrees.  As I look toward the west, dark gray clouds are rapidly moving eastward. The flowers that have graced the spring gardens at Valley View have started to wilt and many may be decimated by tonight’s expected torrential downpour. 

Take a moment to walk the gardens and see what has bloomed thus far.

Iris reticulata
Iris reticulata
Daffodil flowers and Darwin Tulips
Daffodil flowers and Darwin Tulips
Helleborus and Dutchman's Breeches
Dutchman’s Breeches and Helleborus

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Hyacinths in front of the house
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Hellebores in the lower garden

Come back again to take a closer look at the flowers of Valley View, thank you

Parrot Tulips – A Magnificent Mutation

I remember as a child I loved Parrot Tulips.  I loved everything about them.

I loved their color, their name, their shape and even their leaves.

I spent hours trying to capture their uniqueness in drawings, I read everything I could about this flamboyant blossom.

Most surprising to me was that it’s creation was due to a virus. 

Thank you to the virus and thank you to horticulturists who took those first Rembrandt tulips and turned them into what they are today!

Now the plot thickens. An insect that usually infested Dutch peaches and potatoes found a new home in the tulip bulb. It carried the mosaic virus, which infected and began to affect the tulips but did not kill the bulbs for some time. While the tulips lived, the virus caused their blooms to mutate producing brilliant flames of color and ragged broken petal shapes. These new tulip forms were sometimes called Bizarres and Bybloemens, and eventually came to be known as Rembrandt tulips. It must have been amazing to Dutch growers to watch the process take place. They had no understand of the virus that was at work on their gardens, and the continual changes taking place in the new flowers must have been magical and fascinating.

from:  www.essortment.com/history-tulips-66173.html

How Does the Garden Grow

With Bachelor Buttons and Parrot Tulips . . .

Names help us envision gardens filled with Alice in Wonderland flowers,

populated with faces of fanciful creatures, colors of ocean currents

and candy canes.

Thank you for stopping by the garden to see what’s blooming! 

Tomorrow Parrot Tulips!

Cycles

We plant with high hopes that our time has been well spent.

But each year a myriad of natural events occur which we have no control over. 

Abnormally hot summers, warm, dry winters, sub-freezing temperatures or warm springs.

Each event impacts each plant in a unique way. Where tulips grew in profusion last year, grape hyacinths stand tall.