Butterflies Tawny Emperor and Common Buckeye

 Take a moment and reflect on what you actually see. Two multifaceted eyes,  four multi-colored wings and six slender legs all bursting forth from a chrysalis or pupa.  In our wildest dreams could we have imagined such intricate beauty?

Tawny Emperor

http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Asterocampa-clyton

Common Buckeye

Buckeye Butterfly  on Wild Garlic

Common Buckeye Buttertfly wings opened

http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Junonia-coenia

Butterflies that Grace the Gardens – 5

The fifth in the series of photographs featuring butterflies that lived amongst  the flowers of Valley View.

The Buckeye is by far my favorite butterfly that shares the gardens at Valley View. The excitement I felt the first time I saw one gliding through the air was explosive!  I know I must have appeared as a mad woman running after this small creature hoping it would settle long enough for me to photograph it! As you can see by the photos this happened not once, but three times!

 Common Buckeye
Junonia coenia Hübner, [1822]

Family: Nymphalidae
Subfamily: Nymphalinae
Identification: Upperside is brown. Forewing with 2 orange cell bars and 2 eyespots; part of white subapical band appears in the largest, lower eyespot. Hindwing has 2 eyespots; upper one is largest and contains a magenta crescent. Underside of hindwing is brown or tan in the wet season (summer) form and rose-red in the dry season (fall) form.
Wing Span: 1 5/8 – 2 3/4 inches (4.2 – 7 cm).
Life History: Males perch during the day on low plants or bare ground to watch for females, flying periodically to patrol or to chase other flying insects. Females lay eggs singly on leaf buds or on upperside of host plant leaves. Caterpillars are solitary and eat leaves. Caterpillars and adults overwinter but only in the south.
Flight: Two to three broods from May-October, throughout the year in the Deep South.
Caterpillar Hosts: Plants from the snapdragon family including snapdragon (Antirrhinum) and toadflax (Linaria); the plantain family including plantains (Plantago); and the acanthus family including ruellia (Ruellia nodiflora).
Adult Food: Favorite nectar sources are composites including aster, chickory, gumweed, knapweed, and tickseed sunflower. Dogbane, peppermint, and other flowers are also visited.
Habitat: Open, sunny areas with low vegetation and some bare ground.
Range: Resident in the southern United States and north along the coasts to central California and North Carolina; south to Bermuda, Cuba, Isle of Pines, and southern Mexico. Adults from the south’s first brood migrate north in late spring and summer to temporarily colonize most of the United States and parts of southern Canada. Comments: The eyespots may be used to scare away predators.

 

Thank you for dropping by. If you’re so inclined, please let me know what you think.  Leave a comment or tell me if you like this post.

Be sure to stop back to view new images of butterflies in and around the garden!

Enjoy your day

Magnified Musings – An End to a Season

As our sun sinks lower and lower on the horizon in Northeastern Pennsylvania and blue skies

are overtaken by gray clouds

moments of radiating warmth bring forth a multitude of creatures sipping nectar,

collecting pollen

or otherwise basking tired bodies on petals of chiffon.

They live for today.

They, nor I, know what tomorrow will bring.

Tonight I will light a fire in the wood stove.

I have been warned a killing frost may find its way into micro-climates in the valley.  Another chapter of this garden is closing, another year completing its cycle…

We may want to hide from the onslaught of time. but it finds us no matter where we conceal ourselves…

Later That Day . . . August 26th

As the day progressed the sun kept shining and without the Weather Channel we would never have known a hurricane was bearing down on the Northeast USA.  As I look back on the photos of that day,  I see that perhaps the smaller creatures  knew something was on the way and were getting ready, stocking up on food supplies and extra internal heating sources.

THE BEE AND THE BUCKEYE

THE SPOTTED CUCUMBER BEETLE ON CALENDULA

BLACK AND YELLOW ARGIOPE EATING LUNCH

QUESTION MARK BUTTERFLY SUNNING ITSELF ON THE BRICKS

PRAYING MANTIS EATING A BEETLE

BUCKEYE ON WILD GARLIC TAKING IN THE SUN

ENJOY . . .