Repurposing the German Bank Barn

Yesterday Michaele asked about the history of the barn. When we moved into our home in 2004 I did research at out local county seat to find out the story of the property. What I learned was the barn’s construction began in the year of  1895 by the Snyder family.  The family home was built shortly thereafter. The Bugnito family bought the property in 1920 for $2150.00. The family continued to  lived on the property until the early 1970’s. In 1974 it was bought by a young couple. They and their daughter lived here until 1996.  They utilized the barn and property. Goats and chickens roamed the property and their horse, Partly Cloudy lived in the lower stall of the barn.

Pennsylvania German Bank barn
The original sign post

Once they moved on the barn was never again utilized as anything more than a work or gathering space.  That brings us to today. My husband and I are the fifth owners of the barn and home. Occasionally we’ve held parties in the main hall of the barn. Other areas were filled with wood and home to a small colony of Brown bats The lower rooms are our work space. So when Katie and Noelle approached us in the spring to ask about using the barn for their wedding, we felt it was an opportunity to refresh the spirit of the barn. After a weekend of rewiring and cleaning a new energy is emerging.

Pennsylvania German Bank barn
When I shared with my neighbor how I believed a chandelier would add to the spirit of the barn he later came by with this in hand. It had hung above his dining room table.  He said it was no longer of use to him and would gladly give it to the barn!

Please continue to stop by and “like” so I know you’ve been here!  Ask questions, share your thoughts…

dscn6020

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8 thoughts on “Repurposing the German Bank Barn

  1. Absolutely awesome! I love the beautiful glow that the chandelier throws into all areas of the barn. It is perfect for the wedding(s). You and Dan are wonderfully giving that gorgeous structure a repurposed life. Looking forward to watching more of the transformation. Thanks Bonnie!

  2. Thanks for sharing some additional info on the history of your barn. It does bring to mind the cliche “if those walls could talk” …fascinating stories could be told. There is an old pre civil war barn across the street from us and local lore says it was used as a waystop in the Underground Railroad.

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